Premier League Stars Sign Up to Common Goal Initiative

Premier League Stars Sign Up to Common Goal Initiative

As you may know, here at Bid-In we are eager to celebrate people doing great things for charity, thrilled when high-profile individuals get stuck in and share some of their fortune.  
 
This week, Premier League stars, Charlie Daniels and Alfie Mawson, have become the first English footballers to sign up to Common Goal, the charity launched in the summer by co-founders; Jurgen Griesbeck, the CEO of streetfootballworld and Manchester United’s Spanish midfielder, Juan Mata. 
 
Streetfootballworld; an award-winning NGO (non-Governmental organisation) was set up by Griesbeck in Germany in 2002 but the idea behind Common Goal goes back a lot further than that. In 1994 Griesbeck was studying in Medellin, Colombia, at a time when drug-related crime was rife in the South American country. Colombian international footballer, Andres Escobar, was murdered after the defender scored an own goal in a crucial World Cup game against the USA. In the immediate aftermath of the tragedy, Griesbeck abandoned his studies and set up the charity, Football for Peace in Colombia. 
 
Following the success of Football for Peace in Colombia, Griesbeck recognised that he could create something much more powerful and efficient by simply developing a network of charitable organisations and he therefore moved back to his native Germany. where streetfootballworld was born.  
 
Griesbeck explained, “Today we are 125 organisations working out of 80 countries. On a daily basis we are working with two-and-a-half million young people and there are so many individual stories we have come across over the years. I admire the leadership shown by people. They identify a problem locally and see that there is nobody taking care of it, not the Government, nobody, so they create the solutions out of nothing. Often, they face life-and-death risks with no resources but they still do what they need to do.” 
 
He continued, “There are also the young people who are just ignored by society but through football are integrated into that society and find a future. It inspires them to be someone in life and convince them that they can create a sustainable livelihood out of their own skills. Football attracts them and allows them to build trust with other people. It exposes them to a dignified environment and makes them believe in themselves. There are so many stories, whether it is girls in India, HIV positive people in South Africa or homeless people in the UK.” 
 
Common Goal describes football as the “largest social phenomenon on the planet” and the new initiative will give footballers the opportunity to unite, pledging a small percentage of their wages to a collective fund which is then used to fund football charities around the world. 
 
Co-founder, Juan Mata, became the first footballer to pledge 1% of his annual salary to the fund and called on his fellow professionals to help him create a Common Goal Starting XI. World Cup winners; Mats Hummels, Georgio Chiellini, Megan Rapinoe and Alex Morgan, as well as German international, Serge Gnabry, had already matched Mata’s 1% pledge but now English Premier League duo; Daniels and Mawson have taken the number of professional footballers signed up to twelve. 
 
AFC Bournemouth midfielder, Charlie Daniels, explained, “It just seems right that our national sport gives something back to society. If my pledge can help spread the idea of Common Goal, especially among the younger players, then it will be one of the proudest achievements of my career.” 
 
Swansea City defender, Alfie Mawson, said “It was only a few years ago that I was playing non-league and helping out my dad at weekends with his market stall.” 
 
The England under-21 international, continued, “Common Goal allows me to focus on my career while forming part of something that can really help transform lives of those less fortunate.” 
 
Explaining his dream for Common Goal, Jurgen Griesbeck says, “This is more of an attempt to embed philanthropy at the core of what football is about. This is why we talked about 1% and not 10%. The idea was to say that football has this massive power for social good so why don’t we make it part of what football is all about. Let’s take one per cent of everything that is generated from football, put it into a central fund and maximise its impact. Let’s just do it and make the new 100% in football, the 99% instead. We can integrate this power for social good. With the football industry having developed into an economic powerhouse in the last 20 years, we felt it was the right time.” 
 
If you are looking for ways to raise money for charity, then be sure that we at Bid-In can help. Offering silent auction services across the UK and overseas, we have worked with organisations of various sizes. For more information, contact us today!